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Landscape

Winter Storm

This is what Atlanta woke up to this morning.

 

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Maine Trip-3

My husband and I spent 5 glorious nights at The Birches Bed and Breakfast in Southwest Harbor, Maine this past summer. The house was nestled into the woods and surrounded by a beautiful garden. The highlight of our visit was our host, Susie Homer. Susie created itineraries for us each day based upon our interests. Her breakfast’s were extraordinary multi-course affairs that included Eggs Benedict, blueberry pancakes, and cod cakes. At a young age, Susie learned to appreciate good food from hanging out with her grandmother and one of her grandmother’s very dear friends. Susie has fond memories of watching Julia Childs cook in her summer home in Maine. The last morning of our visit, I snuck out of bed before sunrise to photograph. As I started to walk towards the dock I spotted a lone deer standing between two pine trees at the water’s edge. Not wanting to disturb the deer I stood still and watched. As the deer raised its head to look at me I lifted my camera and took the picture above.

O'Keeffe Landscape Tour

O’Keeffe Landscape tour at Ghost Ranch

During my recent trip to New Mexico to visit my dad, we had the opportunity to stay in our friend’s beautiful casita in Abiquiu. The landscape in Abiquiu and the surrounding region is where Georgia O’Keeffe drew inspiration for much of her art. She visited Ghost Ranch, a dude ranch just north of Abiquiu, for the first time in 1934, and was inspired by the stunning landscape. She returned every summer to paint until she permanently moved to Abiquiu in 1949. She resided in New Mexico until her death in 1986. Growing up in New Mexico, I was greatly influenced by O’Keeffe’s paintings. Her interpretation of the landscape shaped my appreciation for the land which I still consider magical. Her sense of color, composition and perspective inform the way I see and photograph today.

Remains returned

On June 29th, I flew out to New Mexico to visit my dad. When I boarded the plane in Atlanta I cursed under my breath for being assigned a window seat at the very back of the plane. Little did I realize that from my seat I would have the honor of witnessing the return of Rudy Redd Victor’s remains to his family in New Mexico. Rudy had been missing for 43 years. In June of 1974, twenty-year-old Rudy was last seen in Montana while on leave from the Air Force. He and his girlfriend were headed to Colorado to visit family when he fled the car after an arguement. Since Victor never returned to duty, the Air Force initially listed Rudy as “absent without leave” and then as a deserter. In 1982, a rancher in Montana found a skull on a steep hillside and kept it for two years as a souvenir before turning it in to the local county coroner. Investigations at the hillside found remains which included a lower jaw. Tests at the time were inconclusive and the remains were shelved. As a result of new technological advances, Rudy’s dental records were recently matched to the skull found in Montana in 1974. After 43 years the family finally has closure and Rudy Redd Victor’s military record has been updated to remove his deserter status.

mckoy-park

Today is Christmas, or at least it was when I started to compose this post. We don’t have snow or even coolish temperatures that would warrant wearing a sweater or scarf. What we do have is balmy weather. Yesterday, while walking through our neighborhood I stopped to watch these skateboarders as they skillfully rode up and down ramps and performed tricks on their skateboards. Their grace reminded me of ice skaters gliding across ice. This is the closest ┬áI could come to capturing a winterish scene for a holiday salutation. On this note, I extend warm greetings to all of you during this holiday season and may you find joy, peace and delight in the coming New Year.

fernbank-2

fernbank-1

fernbank-3

The Fernbank Forest, Atlanta’s largest urban forest, has reopened after a two-year ecological restoration project. Invasive species were removed to allow native plants to flourish. This 65-acre forest supports a diverse ecosystem and includes trees that are up to 300 years old. Although the Fernbank Forest is open to the public, access is through the Fernbank Museum of Natural History and well worth a year’s membership. Yesterday was the first time that I had walked in these woodlands. I was in awe of this beautiful and pristine hardwood forest.